Chocolate Tart by Melanie Dupuis and Anne Cazor
Chocolate Tart by Melanie Dupuis and Anne Cazor
Chocolate Tart by Melanie Dupuis and Anne Cazor
Chocolate Tart by Melanie Dupuis and Anne Cazor

Chocolate Tart by Melanie Dupuis and Anne Cazor


Ingredients

Base of rich shortcrust pastry filled with flourless chocolate cake, creamy ganache and chocolate icing.

Preparation: 1 hour
Cooking: 40 minutes
Refrigeration: 3 hours

Variations:

Vanilla chocolate tart: replace the creamy ganache with vanilla mousse
Chocolate tart shell: replace 30 g of the flour with 30 g cocoa powder.

Rich Shortcrust Pastry:

Tart pastry similar to sablé pastry but less crumbly.

Preparation: 15 minutes
Refrigeration: make the pastry 1–24 hours ahead.

Variation:

Chocolate rich shortcrust pastry: replace 30 g of the flour with 30 g cocoa powder.

140 g butter
100 g icing sugar
50 g egg (1 egg)
1 g fine salt
170 g plain flour
25 g almond meal

Shiny Dark Chocolate Icing:

Very shiny icing made from cocoa, used to cover desserts and cakes.

Preparation: 15 minutes.

8 g leaf gelatine
120 g water
100 g whipping cream (30% fat)
220 g caster sugar
80 g bitter cocoa powder

Flourless Chocolate Cake:

Very moist, melt-in-the-mouth cake containing almond paste. It is the base for numerous desserts and tarts.

Preparation: 30 minutes
Cooking: about 15 minutes

70 g chocolate (66% cacao)
35 g Provence almond paste (50% almonds)
15 g egg yolk
20 g butter
80 g egg white
30 g caster sugar

French Meringue:

Uncooked whipped base of egg white and sugar that is part of the composition of beaten pastries and mousses.

Preparation: 15 minutes.

150 g egg white
125 g caster sugar

Creamy Ganache:

Thick and gooey chocolate mixture, made using a base of crème anglaise.

Variation:

Classic ganache: simple mixture of chocolate and whipping cream.

50 g egg yolk
50 g caster sugar
250 g milk
125 g dark chocolate

Method

Making the Chocolate Tart:

Make the rich shortcrust pastry. Make the shiny dark chocolate icing and allow to cool to lukewarm. Make the flourless chocolate cake. Once it has cooled, cut to a diameter of 23 cm.

Take out the pastry 30 minutes in advance. Grease a 24 cm tart ring with butter and place on a baking tray lined with baking paper. Preheat the oven to 150°C, dust the bench top with flour, (TIP: Spread a fine film of flour over the bench top so the dough does not stick. Don’t use too much or it will modify the composition of the dough) roll the pastry using a rolling pin to 2 mm thickness, aerate it (tip: pass air under the dough by lifting it slightly. This prevents it from shrinking during baking) and use it to line the tart ring (TIP: A tart ring allows immediate unmoulding, and resting it directly on a baking tray prevents the formation of air bubbles To line a tart ring, start by greasing it with butter Roll the pastry onto the rolling pin to transport it without tearing it then place it on the ring With one hand, lift the edges, with the other push it down to create a right angle Push gently with your thumb, without leaving a mark The pastry must stick well You can also cut out a disc of rolled-out pastry (measure the diameter of the ring + twice the height of the side)). Prick the bottom with a fork or prepare to bake it blind (TIP: a tart shell can be cooked unfilled or with its filling (such as for an apple tart). The majority of tart shells are cooked unfilled. The fillings are added warm (pastry cream) or uncooked. They are poured into the precooked tart shell then set in the refrigerator. There are several techniques for cooking unfilled pastry: shortcrust pastry and puff pastry, these will swell up easily because of their water content. Baking blind: cut a disc of baking paper that is larger than the tart. Place it on the pastry and add cooking weights or dried beans) as a precaution. Cut off any excess pastry at the brim. Bake for 25 minutes at 150°C.

Check the pastry to see if it is done: it should be uniformly golden. Remove from the oven and allow to cool, then remove the tart ring. Place the disc of chocolate cake in the tart shell.

Make the creamy ganache, then pour it into the tart shell, leaving 2 mm at the top. Refrigerate for 1 hour.

Using a jug or a ladle, pour the icing in the middle of the tart, then tilt the tart slightly to spread the icing to the edges. Let it set in the refrigerator.

Rich Shortcrust Pastry:

If the pastry isn’t smooth enough, don’t hesitate to knead it for a few more turns. Any remaining visible pieces of butter will melt during baking and leave holes in the pastry.

Cream the butter and icing sugar using a spatula. TIP: Work in two steps to mix the textures. Incorporate the first third using a whisk and mixing vigorously to loosen the thickest mixture, then fold in the remaining two-thirds more delicately, using a silicone spatula, to retain the lightness. It is possible to whisk in the remaining two-thirds using the whisk like a silicone spatula; the mixing will occur more rapidly. Use the silicone spatula to check if the mixture is smooth.

Mix in the egg and the salt.

Add the flour and almond meal. Mix using the spatula.

Knead lightly by flattening the dough once or twice using the heel of your hand. Press flat, wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 1 hour, ideally overnight. TIP: Crush the dough with the palm of your hand to check its smoothness. Do this once or twice.

Shiny Dark Chocolate Icing:

Hydrate the gelatine. Bring the water, cream and sugar to the boil. Stir. TIP:Leaf gelatine has been dehydrated and must be rehydrated in order to melt it into a mixture. If it isn’t hydrated well, it will absorb any missing water from the mixture itself, causing it to shrink. Immerse the gelatine in a bowl of very cold water (it melts at low temperatures). Let it soak for at least 15 minutes, then drain it and squeeze it between your hands before adding it to the mixture. Gelatine ‘glues’ mixtures together; in other words, it gives them their structure. The setting time is quite quick Use the mixture straight away, so that the gelling power kicks in as soon as the mixture is put in place, or set it aside and whisk it before using to restore its consistency.

Remove from the cooktop and add the drained gelatine and the cocoa. Whisk to combine.

Blend with a hand-held blender to avoid lumps and bubbles of cocoa. Strain. Use warm. TIP: pass an ingredient or mixture through a fine strainer or sieve to eliminate any solid residues This is the case for vanilla beans in a crème anglaise or for a powder you wish to make finer (such as almond meal) It also helps make a liquid preparation, such as an icing, more fluid.

Flourless Chocolate Cake:

Preheat the oven to 180°C. Prepare a water bath and gently melt together the butter and the chocolate. TIP: A water bath (bain-marie) heats ingredients with steam rather than direct contact with a heat source. The heat on the mixtures is less intense, which means it heats them gently This prevents chocolate from burning or eggs from coagulating Take a large saucepan and a stainless-steel bowl that will rest on the edge without being in contact with the water Put water in the saucepan and heat it (it must be simmering) Put the ingredient/s in the bowl and the bowl on the saucepan, double-checking it does not touch the water.

Put the almond paste in the bowl of a food processor with the blade attached or in the bowl of an electric mixer with the whisk attached. Turn on the machine at average speed, gradually adding the egg yolk. Scrape down the sides from time to time using a spatula.

Once the mixture is smooth, add the melted butter and chocolate at low speed. Pour into a large stainless-steel bowl.

Make a French meringue:

Put the egg white and a quarter of the sugar in the bowl of an electric mixer with the whisk attached.

Turn the mixer on at a quarter of its full speed: the mixture should become foamy.

Increase the mixer to half its full speed. Once you see little waves forming on the surface of the egg white, add another quarter of the sugar.

Increase the mixer to three-quarters of its full speed then, once the egg white clumps around the whisk, add the remainder of the sugar and turn the speed to maximum. Beat for 2 minutes. The meringue will form stiff peaks when you pull the whisk out.

Put one-third of the meringue in the chocolate mixture and whip vigorously.

Add the remaining meringue and fold in delicately using a silicone spatula. TIP: Work in two steps to mix the textures. Incorporate the first third using a whisk and mixing vigorously to loosen the thickest mixture, then fold in the remaining two-thirds more delicately, using a silicone spatula, to retain the lightness. It is possible to whisk in the remaining two-thirds using the whisk like a silicone spatula; the mixing will occur more rapidly. Use the silicone spatula to check if the mixture is smooth.

Once the mixture is smooth, line a baking tray with baking paper and spread the dough out on it. Bake for 12 minutes. When it comes out of the oven, remove the baking paper and leave the cake on the bench top to cool.

Creamy Ganache:

Blanch the egg yolk and sugar using a whisk. TIP: Whisk the egg yolks with sugar to obtain a foamy mixture. It will double in volume. The process of homogenisation will take several minutes and is achieved faster with an electric whisk.

Bring the milk to the boil. When it rises to the top of the pan, pour half of it into the egg yolk and sugar mixture. Stir, then pour back into the saucepan.

Return to the cooktop over medium heat, stirring constantly with a spatula, until the crème anglaise coats the back of the spatula (83–85°C).

Strain the crème anglaise into the chocolate. Mix. Refrigerate until ready to use. TIP: Pass an ingredient or mixture through a fine strainer or sieve to eliminate any solid residues This is the case for vanilla beans in a crème anglaise or for a powder you wish to make finer (such as almond meal) It also helps make a liquid preparation, such as an icing, more fluid.

Equipment

24 cm tart ring (or 8 × 8 cm tart rings).
Strainer.
Hand-held blender.
30 cm × 40 cm baking tray.
Food processor, or electric mixer with whisk attachment.
Sugar thermometer.



Credits: This is an edited extract from Patisserie by Melanie Dupuis and Anne Cazor published by Hardie Grant $59.99 available in stores nationally.


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