Sleigh My Name, Sleigh My Name – Seven Christmas Traditions from Around the World.

By Leigh O’Connor.

Are you a rebel without a Claus? Do you need time to spruce things up before your guests arrive for the ultimate Christmas Day feast?

Your presents is requested or yule be sorry you missed out on these seven fun and scary Christmas traditions from around the world:

Sweden:

The Yule Goat has been a Christmas symbol dating back to ancient pagan festivals. In 1966, the tradition took on new life when someone came up with the idea of making a giant straw goat, now known as the Gavle Goat. 

Sleigh My Name, Sleigh My Name – Seven Christmas Traditions from Around the World.
Sweden’s Yule Goat weighs in at 3600 kg and is almost 13 metres high.
 
Weighing in at 3600 kg and almost 13 metres high, the goat is constructed in the same spot each year and fans can watch a live stream from the first Sunday of Advent until after New Year, when it is taken down.

Iceland:

Similar to the 12 days of Christmas celebrated elsewhere around the globe, Iceland celebrates 13 – each night children are visited by the 13 Yule Lads. After placing their shoes by the window, little ones head upstairs to bed and in the morning find either candy (if nice), or shoes full of rotten potatoes if they are naughty.

New Zealand:

Aotearoa has its own version of the Christmas tree, called the Pohutakawa. This coastal species blooms bright red in December, providing shade of sunny Summer days as revellers sing carols in both English and Maori.

Sleigh My Name, Sleigh My Name – Seven Christmas Traditions from Around the World.
Aotearoa’s Christmas tree the Pohutakawa makes a spectacular December display.
 
Ireland:

The Irish leave a tall red candle in the front window overnight as a symbol of warmth and shelter for the festive season. Traditional Christmas fare in Ireland includes homemade roast goose, vegetables, cranberries and of course, potatoes.

Sleigh My Name, Sleigh My Name – Seven Christmas Traditions from Around the World.
Red candles are left in the window of Irish homes as a symbol of warmth and shelter.
 
Austria:

Many alpine countries like Austria believe a devil-like creature called Krampus joins festivities on December 6. Children put together a list of their good and bad deeds – good kids are rewarded with sweets, apples and nuts – while those on the bad side worry about what Krampus might deliver on Christmas morning.

Sleigh My Name, Sleigh My Name – Seven Christmas Traditions from Around the World.
Watch out kids…Krampus is about!

Ukraine:

As Orthdox Christians make up almost half of Ukraine’s population, Christmas Day is celebrated on January 7. Locals dress in traditional garments and walk through town singing carols. A dish of kutya – cooked wheat mixed with honey, ground poppy seeds and nuts – is a popular Christmas Eve treat; some believe if you throw a spoonful at the ceiling and it sticks, there will be a good harvest in the New Year.

Switzerland:

Swiss families make their own advent calendars for the festive season, which are either given to children as a surprise or made together as a fun Christmas activity. Each day reveals a new treat with the biggest gift left for December 24.

Sleigh My Name, Sleigh My Name – Seven Christmas Traditions from Around the World.
Swiss families make their own advent calendars for festive fun.