Savoury Turkish Pide - Chef Recipe by Nehir Kayice

Savoury Turkish Pide - Chef Recipe by Nehir Kayice


Ingredients

Dough:

1 cup warm water
2 Tbs dry yeast
1 tsp salt
3 Tbs oil
1/2 cup yoghurt
1 tsp sugar
2 1/2 cups flour

Meat Filling:

250 g lamb or beef mince
1 onion
1 tsp salca (capsicum paste)
Pinch of salt and pepper

Cheese Filling:

1 cup grated low fat feta cheese
1/2 cup chopped parsley

Topping:

Beaten egg yolk
Sesame seeds

Method

Dough:

Combine warm water, yeast and sugar. Stir and set aside until yeast activates (foams up in about five minutes).

Sift flour into bowl, make a well in the centre. Sprinkle salt onto flour and in the well add yoghurt, yeast mix and oil. Stir to combine.

Remove from bowl onto lightly floured surface and knead for five minutes, adding flour until the dough doesn’t stick onto hands.

Shape into a ball, place in a bowl and cover with cling wrap. Leave somewhere warm for 30 minutes.

Mince Filling:

Cook mince in a pan until meat is cooked to liking. Add oil and stir for 1 minute, then add finely chopped onion and cook until soft. Add salt and pepper and salca and cook for another few minutes.

Remove from heat.

Cheese Filling:

Soak the block of feta in cold water for 15-20 minutes before grating. This helps remove the salt from the cheese.

Grate or crumble with fingers into small pieces and add parsley.

Preheat oven to 220 C.

Remove dough from bowl and knead for 2-3 minutes. Cut into four pieces and roll into balls.

Roll out in one direction until an oval shape appears, about 30 x 20 cm.

Place filling into centre of oval to about 20 x 10 c. Pinch both ends to close and fold side in leaving centre open about 5 cm.

Brush pastry with beaten egg yolk and sprinkle with sesame seeds.

Bake in oven for 20-25 minutes until golden brown.

Recipe provided by Turkish Tea House


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