About Cania Gorge National Park

West of Bundaberg, Cania Gorge National Park highlights the region's natural beauty in an assortment of open eucalypt woodland, towering cliffs, sheltered gorges and Aboriginal artwork. 3000 hectares of picturesque landscape is encompassed within Cania Gorge, including a dry rainforest of orchids and figs, with vines and moss growing in the moist, sheltered areas. Lake Cania is the ideal location for a park pit stop to enjoy the surrounding beauty, with a variety of walking tracks showcasing the parks diverse wildlife habitats. Be sure to take a walk to see Giant's Chair Lookout, where the views alone are enough to sweep you off your feet.

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A few words from Cania Gorge National Park

Getting there and getting around
The Castle Mountain lookout provides a spectacular view north across Cania Dam, which lies at the end of Cania Road. Photo R Ashdown, NPSR
The Castle Mountain lookout provides a spectacular view north across Cania Dam, which lies at the end of Cania Road. Photo R Ashdown, NPSR

Parks of Monto and surrounds locality map (PDF, 347K)
Cania Gorge map (PDF, 214K)
Cania Gorge National Park is about 225 km west of Bundaberg and can be reached via Cania Road, which branches off the Burnett Highway 12 km north of Monto (or 82 km south of Biloela). Travel through Moonford for another 13 km to the main picnic area. If travelling from Brisbane the park is 500 km north-west.

Wheelchair accessibility
Wheelchair-accessible toilets and picnic tables are available at Three Moon Creek picnic area.

Park features
Fern Tree Pool. Photo R Ashdown, NPSR
Fern Tree Pool. Photo R Ashdown, NPSR

Cania Gorge preserves a valuable remnant of the Brigalow Belt natural region. More than 150 different types of plant community are found in this region, including brigalow forest, eucalypt woodland, cypress pine woodland, dry rainforest and grassland.

The park is home to more than 90 species of bird. Brush-tailed rock wallabies and common bent-wing bats are also seen.

Aboriginal people have lived in Cania Gorge for at least 19,000 years. Freehand art on the sandstone walls is a reminder of their special way of life.

Read more about the nature, culture and history of Cania Gorge National Park.

Location & Map

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